Develop a Project Management Plan

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LEARNER GUIDEICTPMG610Develop a Project Management Plan.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 2 of 29This LEARNER GUIDE, its contents and layouts, and any inclusions arethe property of MILCOM Institute, and no part may not be reproduced inany form without prior written permission of MILCOM InstituteApart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1985.The information contained in this binder and materials handed outDuring the course are designed to be used for educational purposes only.Some diagrams, pictures and information included in this reference are withCompliments from Wikipedia and other communications industry websites.MILCOM Institute cannot be held accountable for the contentAccuracy or technical correctness of these materials.Trademarks: Brand and product names are either trademarks orregistered trademarks of their respective holders and areUsed for identification purposes only.ICTPMG610 Develop a Project Management PlanThis STUDENT GUIDE is the support resource for the© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd RTO 6859Trading as MILCOM InstituteW: http://www.milcom.edu.auE: [email protected]P: 1300 369 320Revision ControlV 1.0 | May 2019© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 3 of 29Table of ContentsTABLE OF CONTENTS………………………………………………………………………………….3OVERVIEW………………………………………………………………………………………………….4LEARNING OUTCOMES…………………………………………………………………………………7TOPIC 1: PREPARE PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN………………………………………..8TOPIC 2: DEVELOP AND EVALUATE MANAGEMENT PLAN…………………………….22TOPIC 3: FINALISE DOCUMENTATION…………………………………………………………..26Review and Assessment………………………………………………………………………………..29© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 4 of 29OverviewIntroduction• The Student Guide should be used in conjunction with the recommended readingand any further course notes or activities given by the trainer/assessor.
Topics
Content
Topic 1: Prepare project managementplan
• What is this project all about?• What are we doing and how long is it going totake?• Who and what are we going to need?• Making sure everyone is skilled up• It’s all about the money• Roles and responsibilities• Making sure you get what you ordered• Does everyone understand what we are doing?
Topic 2: Develop and evaluatemanagement plan
• Just so we are clear• Check with the client• Dot the I’s and cross the t’s
Topic 3: Finalise documentation
• The complete works• Presenting
Unit review and Assessment Tasks
© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 5 of 29ContentThe Student Guide includes:• Topics for the unit• Activities• Links to websites containing relevant information• (if the links are broken, copy and paste into a web browser).Activities:The trainer/assessor will provide a simulated work environment therefore, the activitiesprovided in the Student Guide:• Reflect real life work tasks.• Are performed to industry safety requirements as relevant.• Use authentic workplace documentation.• Require you to work with others as part of a team.• Require you to plan and prioritise competing work tasks.• Involve the use of standard, workplace equipment such as computers and software.• Take into consideration workplace constraints such as time and budgets.• Activities will either be self-directed or carried out as part of group or teamwork.• Read through the activity carefully and ask the trainer/assessor for guidance ifrequired.• Time will be allocated for completing the activity, along with class discussion andfeedback.• Some activities may require you to submit work to the trainer/assessor for feedback.Where this is the case, it will be indicated at the bottom of the activity.Video clips:• If presented in class, take part in any class discussions, providing feedback andcontributing to debate and arguments.• If directed to watch the video in self-study, or independently in class, then take notesso that contributions to any future class discussions can be made.Roleplays:The trainer/assessor will direct class roleplays.When undertaking these activities ensure that you understand the purpose of the roleplayand take part as if you are in a professional situation to provide your fellow classmates witha true-to-life experience. Roleplays rely on your ability to act in a manner which imitates reallife situations and can provide you with depth of understanding and practical skills.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 6 of 29Homework/Self-studyAt the end of each session the trainer/assessor will direct you to complete any activities,questions or reading from the day’s session as homework. Further to this, time should bespent in self-study reading topic notes, independent research, completing project work orwatching webinars/video clips that relate to an area being covered.Any work that you submit should be:• Professionally typed and presented, using headings, consistent style and layout.• Your own work and not copy and pasted information from the internet.• If you are using information researched, reference and source the material or link.• Submit your work to the trainer/assessor within the timeframe allocated.Folder Management and Naming DocumentsAs a guide, keep all work for this unit in a folder that has the unit code as its name, alongwith the name of the student. Any activities and assessment tasks should then be saved tothis folder.Save documents logically within the folder structure, include:• Unit code• Task number• Task name• Your last name (optional)• The date or version number (optional)Back upAlways have a backup of work on a different device. If the college has a student networkdrive this would be the safest option, however, a backup to a USB or removable hard driveshould also be undertaken. If using a USB to save files, then ensure a backup is kept on alaptop or home computer.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 7 of 29Learning outcomesBy the end of this unit, students will be able to develop a plan for a telecommunicationsproject, including assessing project requirements and planning for all stages to completionand final documentation.Outcomes include:• Prepare project management plan• Develop and evaluate management plan• Finalise documentation© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 8 of 29Topic 1: Prepare project management planNo matter how simple or complex the project is, upgrading a server in a shared office facilityor rolling out an entirely new cell network, the success of the project relies on having a solidcomprehensive project management plan.So what is a Project Management Plan?The Project Management Plan (PMP) is a document formally approved and which is used tomanage project execution. The PMP clearly defines how the project is executed, monitoredand controlled, and closed.The main criteria of such a document are to provide a comprehensive framework of whathas to be achieved through the execution of the project, procedures to solve it, steps tomeasure and report the project and also as to how the information will be communicatedand importantly who will be involved in it. The PMP should be used as a reference for anydecision that is made on the project and for clarification of unclear areas.From a detailed brief the project manager will develop a project management plan thatincludes a scope, budget, timeline and takes into consideration special skills and anticipatesunusual circumstances such as shutdowns or community concerns. It allows for training,testing and quality assurance. In short, the plan lays out the most practical and realistic pathto completion.What is this project all about?A project brief is an overview of the work to be carried out supported by the rationale forthe work and any assessment, assumptions and implications that would affect the projectgoing forward. The brief usually puts forward an expectation of what the project looks like,what it is designed to achieve, how much it will cost and how long it will take to complete.The brief typically includes the various stakeholders and their roles and responsibilities.For example, a council may own the land the telco wants to build a tower on. The councilhas given conditional permission, such as, no towers within a 5km radius of a school. Theseconditions have to be clear in the brief so the management plan can reflect what efforts arebeing made, how much they will cost and what timeline implications there are in order tomeet the council’s conditions. The brief needs to be evaluated and assessed to determinehow the project can go ahead.The example below covers all the aspects of rolling out a new cell network. It identifies thelegislation of the time as it applies to telecommunication carries as well as outlines thebusiness case for expanding the network. It presents the best-case scenario for location,network deployment and topologies and the methodology of transmission. It identifies allthe areas that will impact on the project from providing security guards on the building siteto project wide financial control. This is a very detailed brief from which a solid projectmanagement plan can be developed.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 9 of 29
Activity: Further reading
The following link is to a comprehensive report from 2014 on the potential for upgrading the cellularnetwork on Norfolk Island. The recommendation is to upgrade and from all the information providedit is possible to develop a project briefhttps://www.regional.gov.au/territories/publications/files/GQI_Norfolk_Island_Mobile_Network_Review_2015.pdf
Take any notes to summarise what you have read and keep for future reference.
What are we doing and how long is it going to take?Firstly, it is important to identify the key tasks of a project and build a timeline of theprocess. These key tasks can be simple building blocks at first and broken down later intomore detailed sections. No matter the size or complexity of the task the project managerneeds to be able to plan to deliver on time and on budget. They must be ready with acontingency for unexpected changes and the timeline document provides the ability toadapt quickly and access all the key information to make decisive practical decisions.These tasks or stages are specific to each project and might include some of the following:• A tender process• Pricing and contracting suppliers• Hiring suitably qualified staff• Preparation of sites• Provision for mobile facilities• Installation, inspection, and testing of the final work• Back office administration• Creating stakeholder engagement teamsThe timeline document also serves as a visual checklist. This is an indispensable aid for aproject manager to be able to assess the progress of the project. At a glance they can tellwhere the hold ups are and what needs to be adjusted to keep the project on track. It alsoprovides the ability to look ahead and see a problem coming and make quick calculations forsuch things as• How many people will be involved?• How much time do they need?• Are there any specialist skills or equipment required?• How much is each stage costing?No matter what style of timeline or schedule you make highlighting the key milestones isvery important. For example, evaluating the power requirements of a facility prior toupgrade could hold the rest of the project up while a decision is made to upgrade the mainsor install a secondary supply.There are dozens of project timeline templates available. The most common is the Ganttchart. Dictionary.com describes it as:a chart in which a series of horizontal lines shows the amount of work done or productioncompleted in certain periods of time in relation to the amount planned for those periods.You can get a comprehensive explanation herehttps://www.gantt.com/© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 10 of 29The value for the project manager is that It visually displays the project broken down intosegments over time and is infinitely modifiable. This is important for the fluid nature of anyproject. It allows for multiple categories to be added or deducted as the project requires. Itcan be utilised for testing assumptions of a projects time and cost and man hours and whenthe project goes ahead the projected timeline can be compared to the actual projecttimeline and the changes from assumption to actual can be easily tracked.This also allows for flexibility in the project. So, if the weather affects the rollout of aparticular stage you can quickly adjust the schedule and alert the departments who areaffected so they can reallocate resources or materials and the project doesn’t come to agrinding halt. Any and all accompanying documentation can be attached in the timeline as adocument. So, if there are any special conditions that will impact on time or cost or quality,they are readily available. Installation processes such as shutdowns or safe work methodsthat need special attention can be noted and they won’t be overlooked. The same appliesfor testing procedures. If a segment of the project needs to be isolated tested and certifiedbefore the rest of the project can continue, then this will be evident in the timeline andexpectations can be managed.
Activity: Build a basic timeline that reflects the most important aspects of the examplebelow
This activity is to be completed in small groups.You are installing a new server over the weekend in a shared office facility. You will have toshut down the main power of the building. Install the server and test all the outlets. You willhave a crew of five people, a supervisor, 3 qualified technicians and a laborer. The buildingis locked on the weekend so you will need security access to the floor and the main switchboard. All materials are to be delivered at 0600 Saturday morning and the first shift ofworkers commence at 0700 on the Monday morning. All occupants need to be made awareof the work and given plenty of time to make arrangements for whatever IT protocol theyneed to implement for shutdowns. You will have to make sure backup and off site accesshave been confirmed and tested.
Use a simple template from Microsoft excel.
© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 11 of 29
Activity: Further reading
Excel can also provide a data base reference tool that takes spreadsheets graphs and links tobuild other ways of looking at a timeline, see the link below:https://www.vertex42.com/ExcelTemplates/project-timeline.html
Take any notes to summarise what you have read and keep for future reference.
Who and what are you going to need? How many of them and when are they going to beneeded?This is called Resource Requirement Planning (RRP). From the timeline you can now producea separate document that identifies what resources are associated with the various stagesof the project. You can also develop your timeline into a more complex matrix so that all theinformation is contained within the same document. This begins as a projection of what isrequired over the lifecycle of the job from commencement to completion. Human, financialand material resources all need to be managed appropriately. Site sheds and portableoffices including portaloos and kitchen facilities are a key part of construction and locationwork. Office furniture, computers, mobile services are important resources that all need tobe managed and accounted for. There are many small items that can be overlooked inputting a project together but when they are added up at the end, they either cost time ormoney. It is better to account for these in the beginning by building a resource requirementplan that supports the project.Two examples might be;• Overages on hiring plant equipment can lead to cost blow outs, similarly, not havingenough of the right equipment can slow a job down and extend the hand over date.• Having a plan printer in the office so changes can be adopted and distributed quickly cansave costly mistakes on the job and possibly be a better financial decision over thelifecycle of the project.Using any spreadsheet software, a simple table can be drawn up based on each stage of theproject using the various departments as categories to allocate resources to.From here you can determine how many people are needed in a specific area, for a givenperiod of time, what materials they need, what other support will be necessary. It willprovide a cost over time summary so that changes can be made accordingly.Example: A travelling road crew installing optic fibre will require resources like wages,meals, accommodation, transport, tools and sundries. The testing and QA team are going toneed mobile communications and test equipment whether on hire or purchased. Using thetimeline of the project the RRP can now be drawn up to determine what materials,equipment, people, need to be considered.Some of the items the plan should include:• Equipment hire – duration, delivery costs, returns, insurances, overages, damages• Equipment purchases – including insurances, calibration costs, consumables damages,repairs, resale value• Transport – rental vs purchase• Location services – accommodation, site facilities, meals• Office expenses – equipment, consumables© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 12 of 29• Office set up – leases• Staff• Contractors• External and 3rd party accounts – material suppliers, labour hire agencies
Activity: Further reading
Imagine you need a fleet of vehicles to service your sites over the period of the project.Should you lease or buy? As a basic example of how much it cost to lease a car compared tobuying one where you might take out a loan, check out this simple calculator.
loan v lease calculator https://www.dinkytown.net/java/lease-vs-buy-calculator.html
The trainer/assessor will facilitate a class discussion about the options.
Making sure everyone is skilled upYou may be lucky to engage the A-team, a highly qualified and experienced team that havedone it all. However, this is unlikely so you will need to provide training for your team. Thisinvolves developing a training plan.In certain projects you may encounter new technologies or methodologies. Depending onthe availability of suitably qualified personnel you may have to train or upskill some of thecrew and in some cases get them officially accredited to be able complete and sign offcertain tasks. Some examples of technical qualifications where training is required could be:• Working at heights• Working in confined spaces• Splicing optic fibre cables• Network testing• Heavy vehicle licenceOver the lifecycle of the project any training that needs to be done needs to be consideredin terms of time off site and the cost to either the individual or the company. Developing atraining plan that has the least impact on the project is crucial therefore the training planshould be synchronised to the project timeline. The idea is to avoid any interruptions to theprogress of the project by having suitably qualified personnel on the job at all times. TheRRP can be used to determine what specialist skills or activities will be needed or carried outon the project. Using this as a template you can create a training plan by simply checking offthe staff that are already qualified.You can create a new chart using the same style of Gantt chart for the overall projecttimeline and use the staff who don’t have appropriate qualifications using these categories• What – specific skills or information are they going to need? Is a licence or certificaterequired?• When – are they going to do this? Is there time in the project lifecycle to take staffaway and train them or will they be asked to do it on their own time?• Where – are they going to get this information? Will there be on-site workshops, orcan the training be done on-line? Does the company have a system in place forinternal training or do you bring an accredited training company to site? Is there anexternal training provider that will accommodate your crew and timing?© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 13 of 29• How – much time will it take, how much money will this cost the project. Will thecompany pay for it? Is there an allowance for the staff if they have to pay for itthemselves?When this plan is complete you can attach it to the project timeline for others to reference.Remember you are trying to allocate time to train staff that will generate the least amountof interruptions to the project.
Activity: Develop a training plan
You are about to renovate a warehouse in a metropolitan area. The existing building has 6-meter high ceilings and you are going to build a multitude of split-level offices to look overthe dispatch centre. The installation requires a complete rewire and install of a complexinternal communications system. You have a crew of twenty; only three of them haveworking at height licences you need to have six people accredited in total. All techniciansneed to have an EWP (Elevated Work Platform) ticket. Currently the same 3 people whohave working at height tickets also have EWP tickets. The EWP ticket is a one-day course anhour away from your site. The working at heights licence is a two-day course. The nearestavailable training facility is more than 2 hours away from the centre of the city. You needhave at least 80% work force on site every day. You have two weeks to get everyone fullyqualified.
Your report should be a 1-page spreadsheet that clearly identifies how many people will betrained over a period of a fortnight. Indicate whether the site is open 5 or 6 days a week.Allow for the cost of training (could include the course cost, travel, accommodation, meals,mandatory equipment or clothing), any time off site. It should indicate the staffing level atany given time on site. Allow a contingency for hiring already qualified staff to cover anyshortfalls.
Submit your report in a professionally written and structured report to your trainer/assessorfor feedback.
It’s all about the moneyDeveloping a budget (a general list of planned expenses) is done in two stages: the estimateand the actual.The estimate reflects the assumptions based on the project timeline and the details youhave at the time of entering the data.The actual records the real costs of the project as it goes ahead.In the estimate you do your best to account for all the items that will need to be paid forover the time of the project.• Stage 1 – design and plan• Stage 2 – implementation• Stage 3 – close out and hand overUsing the project timeline, you can create categories like tasks or stages. You then have tofind out how much each of those items is going to cost. The screenshot below gives you anidea of how the layout works and by entering values into the appropriate cells thespreadsheet will then calculate the totals.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 14 of 29
Activity: Further reading and Video
If you haven’t used excel before here is a link to a 20-minute video explaining how to do ithttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwbho0CgEAE length (21:46)
The trainer/assessor will facilitate a class discussion about the outcomes from the video.
The budget can be as simple or as complex as the task requires:A very simple example would be a small office upgrade:ESTIMATE: Two technicians for four hours, cable and accessories (such as conduit,terminators, mounting plates), travel costs – parking tolls and fuel. You could do this on anotepad and be pretty close however, using the spreadsheet above you will see items thatyou may have not considered at first. For example; The cable might need to be deliveredincurring a courier fee. To accommodate the office workers, you may have to schedule oddhours incurring penalty rates for the techniciansACTUAL: The job eventually takes five hours, so the cost of labour is more than estimatedand the parking added an extra hour. The crew use less cable than expected so there is arefund available on the unused cable.Using your project timeline to provide the categories of expenses you can develop a realisticbudget that can be used to track the progress of the project as it happens.Begin with the preliminary tasks• planning• design© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 15 of 29• consultations• tenders• contracts• admin• office hire• accountants’ fees• set up costs.then move onto implementation drawing from the RRP like• construction• staff• equipment hires• training• materials• consumables (batteries, tape, fuel etc)There will be ongoing costs and one-off fees and remember to include any discounts anddeals that you will get including any government charges, or grants that may offset initialcosts.The last section of the budget addresses the close out and hand over costs and covers thingslike• testing• remediation• rubbish removal• final payments (if there were staged payments)• commissions• lease payouts• bonusesIt’s possible there will be funds coming back from returns, such as deposits on hires orunused stock and materialsStart with basic categories: people, equipment, materials, external charges capitalexpenditure, hire charges, finance, sub-contractors, office costs and then add the detaileditems associated with these categories. Some costs are recurring others are once only upfront charges. Be prepared to revisit this document and amend any or all of it regularly.Below is a very generic example of a project budget. It outlines the amounts, the areas ofoperation, the team or departments allocation in that area as well as a summary oroverview of each stage allowed for.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 16 of 29Sourced from: http://sketchup3dconstruction.com/const/images/project-managementcost-estimate-worksheet.jpg© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 17 of 29
Activity: Further reading
This link explains in more depth the concept and types of calculating costs:https://www.inc.com/encyclopedia/costs.htmlOnly for the truly fiscally prepared.
Everyone has a role and a responsibilityA project is made up of a variety of interests. Even the simplest project has a client andprovider relationship. Who is the client and what is their involvement apart from wantingthe job done? Who is the provider apart from offering their service? Let’s imagine the clientis a government department with multiple agendas and the provider is a major constructioncompany with several divisions.How do we work out who is who and what they do and more importantly what they expectfrom each other and the project as a whole? Building an organisation chart is the first step.This displays the hierarchical nature of the interested parties. Into the org chart we canattach any documentation that supports or influences the expected outcomes from thatdepartment’s point of view.For a full explanation of how to build an organisation chart go herehttps://mymanagementguide.com/how-to-develop-project-organization-chart-in-6-steps/In short there are 6 steps1. Identify key personnel2. Assemble a senior management team3. Assign project coordinators4. Identify key stakeholders5. Establish training requirements6. Develop an org chartThe complexity of the project will determine the detail the org chart needs to show. In theexample below you can see a fairly simple structure. Any level that needs furtherexplanation can be expanded or a complete org chart dedicated to that area can bedeveloped. This hierarchical view of the project should reflect all the components includingthe external stakeholders whether corporate interests, financial sponsors or governmentrepresentativeshttps://www.buildridge.com.au/who-we-are/organisation-chart/© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 18 of 29
Activity: Further reading
Examples of some government organisation charts are here:https://www.finance.nsw.gov.au/sites/default/files/policy-documents/DFSI-organisationalstructure_1_0_18.pdfhttps://www.hpw.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/6325/OrganisationalChart.pdf
Discuss this in class with regard to the complexity of government organisations what level ofdetail you imagine is expected from the various departments.
© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 19 of 29Making sure you get what you orderedYou are going to have make sure that everything has been tested and is fit for purpose, and,any systems you suggest putting in place will work. To do this across the whole project youwill have to produce a project verification document. This document will cover monitoringand control processes, and review processes such as quality audits. This document presentsa systematic process of checking a component, product or service meetsregulations or specification requirements. The document references the project timelinetaking into account the various stages from acquisition to deployment and the potentialinterruption to project end or during service.Project-management-knowledge.com provides this explanation:Verification is a quality assurance process or technique applied by Project Managementwhereby an evaluation of a component, product or service is completed at the end of aphase or project to verify or confirm that it satisfies all of the regulations or specificationsrequirements. Verification can take place during production or development and is generallyan internal process.By implementing a verification process, you can save the project from the financial burdenof expensive and unexpected delays in a project.The project brief will outline the purpose of the job and the scope of work will outline howthat is to be achieved. The verification document is evidence that the work has been doneand tested to the standards set out in the design brief. Let’s say you have been asked to fitout a call centre to accommodate 10 operators initially and provide the facility to expand ifdemand grows. The equipment specified will need to be modular and expandable withminimal interruption to service and no loss in overall performance. These performancecriteria can be tested, and the results recorded in the verification documentWhere you are verifying a piece of equipment it’s necessary to explain the techniqueemployed and the conditions under which the tests were conducted. Equipment Testsshould include their nominal operating ranges with tolerances, contingencies and exclusionsclearly identified. Where a process or routine is being verified then a pass or fail check listwill usually suffice.The verification document should also contain a summary of the testing results. Ifeverything tests ok then the project is fit for service however if during testing there arefaults or inconsistencies then these need to be identified and suggestions made as to howremedy them.
Activity: Further reading
This is a great explanation of the need to verify and validate equipment, products andprocesses of https://project-management-knowledge.com/definitions/v/verification
Discuss this in class with regard to specific roles and responsibilities in your area of expertise.
Be prepared for the list of processes, services and equipment to grow over the cycle of thejob meaning your need for verification is going to increase as well.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 20 of 29Does everyone understand what we are doing?Prior to finalising the draft plan make sure you have consulted with all the contributing anddecision-making parties. Start by working through the org chart to identify what level ofapproval or review is necessary from each department or stakeholder.Develop a check list of approvals, confirming that all stakeholders have been consulted andthe draft documents have been sighted and approved or comments and changes have beennoted and or incorporated. The table below shows a very simple example of a documentrelease record
Code
Title
Description
Doc.Status
Doc.class
Publicationdate ordate forapproval
Authority toapprove
Dateapproved
NM.001
Networkmanagement– commercialcontrols
Thisprovidesguidelineson networkmanagement in thecommercialenvironment
V4
H
12.10.2019
OP.101
Operationalimplementation
Thisprovidesoperationalguidelinesinstallation
V4
H
12.10.2019
NM.002
NetworkmanagementDomesticcontrols
Thisprovidesguidelineson networkmanagement in thedomesticenvironment
V4
H
02.09.2019
PC.201
Hardwareprocurementandspecifications
Suggestedguidelinesaroundhardwarepurchaseand or lease
V3
M
10.10.2019
All documents should incorporate some sort of version control so that is it’s clear whichversion has been approved or marked for review.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 21 of 29Version ControlDocuments and Sub Documents for release are identified by a release number starting atone and increasing b0079 one for each release.• Documents can be identified as follows:• all should have a release number (and a revision letter if in draft).• the original draft should be Release 0.A;• subsequent drafts should be Release 0.C, Release 0.C etc;• the accepted and issued document is Release 1.0;• subsequent changes in draft form become Release 1.0A, 1.0B etc; and• The accepted and issued second version becomes Release 1.1 or Release 2.0, asdetermined by the Project Manager.• Computer file versions may be identified by date and time stamp including file size.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 22 of 29Topic 2: Develop and evaluate management planFor this topic, we are going to use the following example to illustrate how to develop andevaluate a management plan:The Project Brief: Refurbish a disused warehouse into a modern call centre. Let’s call thecompany Call Centre Headquarters. CCHQInterested parties: CCHQ, Real estate agent, Construction Company, employment agency,office fit out company, Telco provider, energy authorities, and local council.The property is a commercial lease and the all the equipment and furniture will be capitalexpenditure. The property contains a storage shed / garage below with a mezzanine officeabove.The project is fitting out the necessary hardware for a modern functioning call centre.In general, these are the basic stages involved and the responsible parties:1. Design brief approval – 1 week2. Scope of works approval – 1 week3. Network design including cabling and infrastructure layout and plan: ITconsultants – 1 week4. Base building: remediation and upgrade including house services commonlighting etc: construction company, subcontractors, build and design consultants– 2 weeks5. Other trades: HVAC, plumbing, joiners, Construction Company and subcontractors – 3weeks6. Install cables, terminals and equipment: IT contractor and consultants – 3 weeks7. Test and verify services: IT contractor – 1 week8. Install furniture and client services: Construction company and office fit out subcontractors – 2 weeks9. Test facility and hand over: IT consultants, sub-contractors – 1 weekSome stages can happen simultaneously or overlap, and some are dependent on thecompletion of others.The design brief and the scope of works for such a job would identify exactly what purposethe centre serves and outline the equipment necessary to carry out that function and howthat equipment should be configured. There would be specifications as to how the outsideworld would connect to the centre e.g. via mobile, copper or fibre and whether the internaldata transmission would be Wi-Fi or cable for a combination.Just so we are clearBefore you deliver the plan and commit to the schedule you need to make sure you are allon the same page. This means clarifying your understanding of the project from purpose toimplementation. To do that you build a preliminary plan which in broad strokes identifies allthe areas of the project as you understand themThe project plan is made up of but not limited to:• Communication plan• Financial plan• Change management plan• Risk management plan• Resource plan© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 23 of 29Each of the smaller plans contains the specific areas of impact – time, money, humanresources, material resources, compliance with standards and regulations, quality controland stakeholder approvals, how to deal with changes and mitigate risks.Communication plan – list all the stakeholders and their roles in the project. Determinethrough which channels and how frequently you are going to communicateResource plan – list all the resources required to complete the project. This is people,property, equipment, materials, and expendables. Resource management can be complexand volatile. Creating a WBS (work breakdown structure) is essential. A WBS organises allthe tasks into a multilevel graphic display providing an easy visual reference to thecomplexity of the project. The resource plan also includes reference to the adherence toregulations, codes, and standards.
Activity: Further reading
For a detailed explanation of WBS:https://www.workamajig.com/blog/guide-to-work-breakdown-structures-wbs
Take any notes to summarise what you have read and keep for future reference.
Financial plan – list all the expenses you expect to incur. Specify the financial processes youintend to employ for example renting office space or leasing specialist plant and equipment.Include expenses incurred in the various payment systems such as intertest on loans,holding deposits on hires and superannuation on wages.Risk management plan – this is a list of all the potential risks, often related to the plansabove. You need to have some strategy in place for dealing with the problem should it arise.You will need to estimate the likelihood of it occurring and the cost to the project in termsof money and time.Change management plan – change is inevitable. You need a plan that outlines how you willadapt your project timeline and budget to accommodate the changes. This plan takes intoconsideration a myriad of potential changes that will impact on how the project is delivered.Arguably the most important part of this plan is the method for communicating, bothrequests for and instructions to change, across the project.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 24 of 29
Activity: Further reading
Find a more detailed explanation herehttps://www.invensislearning.com/resources/pmp/developing-project-management-planexplained
Take any notes to summarise what you have read and keep for future reference.
There are any numbers of plans you can add as the project demands. As the project growsyou will need to keep it under control. The installation plan for example sets out the timeframe and methodology of installing all the new equipment and allows for testing andrefining to the service. The plan is based on whatever regulations and codes are relevant tothe facility and location of the installation.For example, WHS will need to be managed across the project and therefore needs a plan.Keeping a register of site Inductions, PPE issues, qualified first aid staff, are just a few ofcategories you are obliged to comply with under Safe work Australia guidelines. Each sitehas its own specific risks and hazards, as does the type of work being carried out. You needto familiarise yourself with the codes and regulations by and develop plan around them. Formore information of how SFA regulates the various industries go their website at:https://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/
Activity: Report
Choose a category from the list below and then identify three risks associated with that taskand the preventative measures you can take to avoid injury.
Working at heights – https://www.safework.nsw.gov.au/hazards-a-z/working-at-heightsConfined spaces – https://www.safework.nsw.gov.au/hazards-a-z/confined-spacesElectrical safety – https://www.safework.nsw.gov.au/hazards-a-z/electrical-andpower/electrical-workManual handling – https://www.safework.nsw.gov.au/hazards-a-z/manual-tasks
Your report should be no more than a page and be written in clear and concise English.
Submit your report in a professionally written and structured report to your trainer/assessorfor feedback.
Check with the clientWhen the preliminary plan is finished it can be sent to the client for review so that anyamendments or changes can be discussed before producing the final plan forimplementation.
Activity: Group work role-play
Divide into small groups. One of you is the client and one of you is the project manager. Using theCCHQ refurbishment example the client can ask for clarification around certain areas of the project thatthe project manager should be able to address. Any hypothetical situations the client raises should beaddressed by referencing any of the smaller management plans, financial, communication etc
Your trainer/assessor will provide your group with feedback.
© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 25 of 29Dot the I’s and cross the T’sThe final plan is an expanded formalised version of the preliminary plan. All the values anddetails can be plugged into the various documents. Estimates and assumptions are checkedfor accuracy and then committed.All the accompanying documentation can now be collated and attached to the variousdepartment specific folios. Some of those might be:• Project Description• Project Schedule• Implementation Plan• For Construction and As Built drawings, Colour Coded• Project Inventory Equipment / Material List• Detailed Project Cost Accounting Spread Sheet• Network Testing Verification Reports• Contact and Escalation List• Customer Acceptance Certificates• Loans and hire agreements• Employment contractsEach department is usually responsible for its own set of documents; the accountsdepartment will keep the invoices and warranty information on purchased equipment, legaland HR hold employee agreements, payroll, contracts and timesheets and so it goes.
Activity: Discuss and produce a draft schedule
Using the CCHQ example discuss the complexity of the various plans as they might apply tothis project then use a simple Gantt chart in Microsoft Excel and build a preliminaryschedule for the work described above, include as many departments as you need.
Discuss your responses in a class discussion facilitated by your trainer/assessor.
© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 26 of 29Topic 3: Finalise documentationThe complete worksThe final set of documents collectively forms the project management plan and outline howthe project is implemented from start to finish. As we said in the beginning it’s aboutdelivering on time and on budget and the Project Management Plan is your road map toachieving this. The project scope outlines the intent of the project, its purpose and how thatpurpose is going to be achieved. Everything in the PMP supports this outcome.The final presentation of this documentation requires collating all the necessary thedocuments signed, authorised and approved by the relevant parties. Ideally, they would beprinted and bound or digitally prepared to look similar to the published version.The documentation should be presented, whether digital or hard copy, in as professional amanner as possible. Include a title page, table of contents, authors, acknowledgments etc.There will always be some project specific documents, but in general the following shouldbe considered mandatory no matter the size of the project:• Project charter – essentially an executive summary that states the purpose and intentof the project and how it benefits the organisation and reflects its culture and values• Project scope – what is the project aiming to achieve and stipulates clearly what isincluded and what is not• Statement of work – this supports the scope by outlining who does what, where andwhen• Project schedule – the schedule can be presented in a standalone timeline orcalendar format where each stage of the project can be easily identified in terms ofstart, end and duration.• Project budget – depending on the complexity of the project the budget documentscan be a simple summary or a full-blown complex spread sheet.• Risk management – this document should spell out clearly what the potential risksand hazards are to the project. They can be prioritised using whatever criteria arerelevant, for example, time, money, labour hire, supplier reliability, etc. They canalso be ranked in terms of their potential affect on the project.• Communication plan – spells out how the various parties involved will communicatewith each other. What channels are they using and the frequency of thatcommunication.• Stakeholder management – this is really the final organisation chart of the projectwith a hierarchical reporting matrix that enhances the communication plan• Procurement strategy – is aligned with the budget and the schedule to indicate howequipment or materials will be bought, hired or leased over the lifecycle of theproject and when and where any expected returns and reimbursements will takeplace• Resource management – is a guide to how the various resources, material, financial,human will be managed and deployed over the life cycle of the project© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 27 of 29• Testing and quality assurance – spell out how the tests will take place and underwhat rules, regulations or controls they were measured. It is used then as evidenceof the quality of the work that proves the project is for service.• Contracts – simply a record and or copies of all the contracts currently written andsigned. Copies of any agreements outside of the project that may have a directimpact on the project need to be included.• Change control – outlines the process for dealing with change requests, reviews,approvals (or denials) and finally implementation• Training necessity and implementation – each stage will have its own needs andnecessity for training. This document describes what is needed, when and how it willtake place and what measures are being taken to minimise the impact to the project.• Close out and handover protocol – sets out the final stages of deliveries, qualitycontrol and project wrap up. Any contingencies that have been made or allowed foror any warranties that extend beyond the close of the project are identified in termsof who takes control and for how longPresentingOnce you have the documentation collated and bound or digitally prepared it’s time to visitthe client, and any other stakeholder who is required for sign off and present your plan.Presenting is a skill in itself and requires just as much research, application and review asany other part of the process. You are telling the story of your project from beginning to endand the key to good storytelling is engaging the audience. In the case of a technical projectit’s easy to forget that the elements of storytelling still apply. There are a number ofresources readily available to help you present effectively and you should take the time toand make yourself familiar with the method or technique that you think will be mostappropriate for you and your project.Effective presentation can be broken down into a few major points• KISS – Keep it short and simple• Use good visual aids and examples• Break it down into 3 sections and if there has to be subsections then only use threeat a time• Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse• Don’t read the slides• If you rely on technology be ready for it to fail• Leave time at the end for questionsHand out the published final documentation so the audience can refer to it if necessary. Itwill be detail heavy and any points of major significance should be in your presentation. Ingeneral presentations are a visual story telling of the project. Using whatever aids, youneed; video, 3d models, slides, graphs and photographs you should be able to present yourplan clearly so that any questions at the end will allow you to bring depth and add value tothe presentation.© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 28 of 29
Activity: Further reading here are some good sites with presentation tips
https://www.presentationmagazine.com/effective-presentation-techniques-the-top-10-149.htmhttps://www.forbes.com/video/4868048569001/https://www.forbes.com/sites/carminegallo/2013/06/11/ten-presentation-techniques-youcan-and-should-copy-from-apples-wwdc-keynote/#65e4c16b36ad
Take any notes to summarise what you have read and keep for future reference.
The trainer / assessor will assign each student or group a particular aspect of the Projectmanagement plan to present. Either use the call centre example above or provide your ownto reflect real world conditions in the industry
Create a presentation that could be used to present the information that you haveresearched.It must include:• Project brief• Scope of works• Stakeholder management including communications management plan• A training plans• A financial plan• Risk management plan• Schedule
The information researched must be professionally presented and in a clear, easy to followstructure.
The presentation should be visually appealing with transitions, animations and consistentstyles and colours.
During the presentation you must demonstrate effective communication skills including:• Speaking clearly and concisely• Using non-verbal communication to assist with understanding• Asking questions to identify required information• Responding to questions as required• Using active listening techniques to confirm understanding
If you are undertaking this activity with a team, each person in the group must contributeequally to the design, development of the presentation and also each member must takepart in the delivery.
The trainer/assessor will observe you conducting the presentation, ask questions at the endand provide feedback on the information presented and the presentation style.
© MILCOM Communications Pty Ltd trading as MILCOM Institute | RTO No. 6859 | CRICOS Provider Code:03491GHead Office: Unit 12/1866 Princes Highway Clayton VIC 3168 | Phone: 1300 369 320 | Email: [email protected]LEARNER GUIDE for ICTPMG610| v 1.0 | Last reviewed: May 2019 | Not controlled when printed |Page 29 of 29Review and AssessmentThe content of this unit has now been covered.Review and completionEnsure any outstanding activities, reading, role-plays, meetings, presentations or furthertasks that require observation or submission to the trainer/assessor has been completed.Assessment TasksThe trainer/assessor will discuss each task in detail – please ensure the assessmentprocedures, submission instructions and deadlines are clear, and you understand anyexpectations.SupportThe trainer/assessor will provide support when required. If any reasonable adjustment isrequired, please speak with the trainer/assessor or college support services.

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